National Association of Birth Centers of Color (NABCC)

Why We Need Birth Centers and Clinics of Color and Why You Should Join Us

 

The National Association of Birth Centers of Color (NABCC) was founded in February 2012 by a group of Certified Professional Midwives from three U.S. States who are committed to serving all women, but particularly women of color, through community-based maternity clinic and birth center services. Each founding midwife member has experience working with women of color through her own clinic and/or birth center, and each founding member has achieved success within their population – meaning that the women being served experience better health and better care through the deliverance of culturally- competent, evidence-based, comprehensive and cost-efficient midwifery and maternity-care home models.

 

WOMEN AND BABIES OF COLOR ARE DYING DISPROPORTIONATELY IN THE USA AND THE GAP IS WIDENING EVERY YEAR
 

A closer look at the communities that NABCC founding members are serving, and the disparities that exist.*

 

Note that Healthy People 2020 goals are:


º  Low birth weight – reduced to no more than 7.8%           

º  Adequate prenatal care – increased by 10%

º  Preterm babies – no more than 11.4%                                

º  Infant death – no more than 6 per 1,000 live births                                    

º  Maternal death - reduced to 11.4 per 100,000 births**


   *African American statistics are shown although Native American, Hispanic and Asian women also experience perinatal racial disparities and continue to be at risk


            ** Maternal mortality stood at 12.7 in 2007 overall, and 26.5 for African American women


 

City/County/State

% of Black

babies born with low birth  weight (less than 5.5 lbs)

% of Black

babies born preterm (before 37 weeks of gestation)

% of Black

women who receive inadequate prenatal care

Infant Mortality rate for Black babies

Los Angeles

County,

California

12.7

16.2

9.6

10.2 per 1,000

compared to

4.4 per 1,000 White babies

San Diego County, California

11.1

14.6

11.5

8.9 per 1,000

compared to

4.6 per 1,000 White babies

Charleston

County, South

Carolina

15.1

19.5

27.0

16.0 per 1,000

compared to

7.1 White babies

Orange County, Florida

12.5

18.6

22.7

12.0 per 1,000

compared to

5.8 White babies

Data provided by March of Dimes, www.MarchofDimes.com/peristats.  Data from 2006 - 2008

YOUR SUPPORT MEANS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LIFE AND DEATH


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